Archive for the ‘relative’ Category

Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 7

January 31, 2012

9i. People who use services receive care, treatment and support from staff who:

●● Ensure they make a record of any medication taken or reminded by the person using the service where this is part of the plan of care.
Carer helping elderly lady
Good record keeping, once more is absolutely key to meeting the essential standards for medicines and should be kept whether you are administering at level 2 or just reminding someone to take their medicines at levels 1 or 2. Do you record the prompting of medication? You should be.

●● Follow clear procedures, that are monitored and reviewed, that explain:
— their role with regards to helping people take their medicines
— what staff should do if the person using services is unable, or refuses, to
take their medicines.

So here you need to review your policies and procedure to ensure that they clearly detail; the role of the carer in administering (or reminding) medicines and what they can and cannot do within the 3 levels of support outlined in the guidance in the National Minimum Standards and CQC guidance.
Do your staff understand what to do, who to notify and what to record when a client refuses to take their medicines? Your policies need to clearly state what to do when a client refuses medication. What to record, who to inform and what consequences might be encountered.
Staff need to be aware that they can inform the client of consequences, they can encourage them to take the medication, they can try in 5 minutes times, perhaps ask a colleague to administer instead, but they cannot force a client to take the medication. A client has the right to refuse whether we think it’s a the right decision or not.

9j People who use services receive care, treatment and support from staff who:
●● Ensure that patient safety alerts, rapid response reports and patient safety
recommendations disseminated by the National Patient Safety Agency and
which require action are acted upon within required timescales.

So there you have it – the last of the part for Outcome 9 in the Essential Standards.
I trust that you have found the information useful and that it has been the catalyst to review policies and training. If Momentum People can support you with either or both please email us or give us a call to discuss.

Children’s medicines advice website launched

December 19, 2011

Here was the news from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Pharmacy Journal earlier this week……

Pharmacists have been involved in creating a new website offering children’s medicines advice to parents.

Launched this week (12 December 2011), “Medicines for children” gives information about how and when to give medicines to children and provides answers to common questions about dosage and side effects.

Users can search the online database according to the brand or generic name of the drug or look up the disease, condition or infection being treated.

Medicines advice leaflets can also be downloaded from the website, developed by the National Paediatric Pharmacists Group, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and national children’s charity Well Child.

Stephen Tomlin, NPPG secretary and consultant pharmacist at the Evelina Children’s Hospital in London, said that the website is in its infancy and will continue to be developed based on feedback from parents and carers.

He said: “At present the team is working to provide evidence-based and accurate information for further medicines through its rigorous, transparent and fully auditable production process.

“We hope that the leaflets stand alone as a quality information source, but also act as a catalyst for enhanced professional and carer engagement on the important topic of medicines and children.”

Consultant paediatrician at London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital William van’t Hoff said the website and leaflets cover a range of issues, from one-off treatments to medicines given for long-term and complicated conditions and disease.He urged healthcare professionals to direct parents to the resource, and pointed out that the leaflets are endorsed by the Department of Health’s Information Standard and are referenced on the British National Formulary for Children’s website.

Top 5 Myths about Compliance Aids in Social Care Dispelled

March 6, 2008

j0390523.jpg  Compliance aids are used extensively in social care and I would like to take this opportunity to clear up a few myths about them if I may.

Myth #1

In order to support a service user with his or her medication it must be in a monitored dosage system (MDS)

This is incorrect. There is absolutely no legal or ethical reason why medication needs to be in a monitored dosage system. It can just as easily and safely be supported from bottles, boxes and original packs as long as the correct checks are made, the dose instructions followed and good records kept. Incidentally these things have to happen for MDS too.

Myth #2

All tablets and capsules can be put into a MDS

This is incorrect. Not all tablets and capsules will remain stable once out of their original packaging and therefore must be dispensed in their original packs.

Myth #3

You can legally support a service user who has their medication put into the MDS by a friend or relative

This is incorrect. All monitored dosage systems must be filled by a pharmacist (or dispensing GP in rural areas). Supporting medication in trays filled by friends or relatives is not legal. If this is happening in your service you should take steps to make changes. Inform relatives or friends that from a certain date (e.g. a month’s time) that you will no longer be able to support the service user if they continue to fill the trays themselves. They should go to the pharmacy and request an assessment under the Disability Discrimination Act in order to have the medication dispensed by the pharmacy into a suitable MDS. If the service user meets the criteria of the Disability Discrimination Act they will be entitled to this service free of charge from the pharmacy.

Myth #4

All MDS systems are appropriate for use in social care.

This is incorrect. Any MDS system used in both care homes and domiciliary care must be dispensed by the pharmacy into a system that is able to be properly labelled to identify it’s contents on the actual pack containing the medication. The system used should also be tamper evident and secure.

Any system that does not meet this requirement should not be dispensed into by the pharmacy for use in social care. This includes the little “finger” type systems that have a different “finger” per day that can be taken separately from the pack. These systems have historically been purchased by the service user and filled by the pharmacy which is fine if they are assessed and unsupported, for you though as care staff supporting service users they are not suitable. If you have clients using these systems please ask the pharmacy to provide a system that meets labelling and security requirements.

Myth #5

The pharmacy dispensed the medication into the tray and therefore it’s nothing to do with me, not my responsibility to make any checks.

This is not correct. You have a legal obligation to check that the right patient receives the right medicine by the right route in the right dose at the right times. So, you then need to check the name on the pack is the right service user. You need to check that the contents of the pack match both what was ordered on the prescription and what is on the medication administration record. You need to check that the strength of the medication is what was expected and that the instructions for use are the same. Do the time slots in the pack match the administration times and do you know exactly how this medication is to taken, used or applied?

I do hope that this has cleared up many common misperceptions about monitored dosage systems and that as a result you will check your policies and procedures and update where necessary.

If you have any further questions about compliance aids or would like support in writing or reviewing polices please contact:-

Tracey Dowe

Email training@momentumpeople.co.uk

Tel 01793 700929

http://www.momentumpeople.co.uk