Archive for the ‘labels’ Category

Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 5

January 17, 2012

9e People who use services detained under the Mental Health act 1983

●●  Receive medicines that are duly authorised and administered in line with the Mental Health act 1983 Code of Practice.


9f People who use services receive care, treatment and support that:

  • follows clear procedures in practice, which are monitored and reviewed and that explain how staff may be permitted to administer homely remedies.

Homely remedies are those medicines that can be purchased by the client or a relative over the counter from a pharmacy, general store of health food shop. Guidance says that carers may support clients with over the counter medicines in the course of their care. And after all, who are we to take away their choice o use these things?

If our care teams are to support our clients with this group of medicines there are certain criteria that need to be met and it is these criteria that you need to be clear on and give clear guidance in your procedures and training for.

If the client purchases the medication themselves (or a relative buys it on their behalf) they should let the care agency know, especially if they require assistance with it from a member of the care team. The care organisation then has a responsibility to check with a pharmacist that that medication is appropriate and safe for that client to take with any other medicines they take and the medical conditions that they have. They should make a record of this conversation and the outcome.  The medication belongs to the client and would be kept by the client (in their room in a lockable cupboard or drawer in a care home) and a record of the administration made on the medication administration record.

I n a care home (residential or nursing) you may choose to buy over the counter remedies to keep in stock in case a resident needs something for a minor aliment such as pain relief, indigestion, sore throat, a cough mixture, a laxative etc. In this instance you must keep these medicines locked away centrally in a separate place to the prescribed medication. You must have authorised in advance by the GP which over the counter medicine can be taken by which resident.

You must also have for each over the counter medicine that you choose to keep, a record of the recommended dose i.e. How much can be taken or used at one time?
How long should you wait before it is taken or used again? Is there a set number of doses allowed with in a set time e.g. no more than 8 in 24 hours? How long do you continue to use that medication if the resident is not getting any better before you refer to the GP? What each medicine is to be administered for and in what circumstance may it be administered?

Once again, these medicines if given or used must be recorded on the medicines administration record at the time of administration.

Next time we’re exploring Outcomes 9g and 9h so watch this space!

Meeting Essential Standards – Managing Medicines

December 12, 2011

What do the regulations say?

Regulation 13 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010

Management of medicines
13.The registered person must protect service users against the risks associated with the unsafe use and management of medicines, by means of the making of appropriate arrangements for the obtaining, recording, handling, using, safe keeping, dispensing, safe administration and disposal of medicines used for the purposes of the regulated activity.

What should people who use services experience?
People who use services:

Will have their medicines at the times they need them, and in a safe way.

Wherever possible will have information about the medicine being prescribed made available to them or others acting on their behalf.

This is because providers who comply with the regulations will:

Handle medicines safely, securely and appropriately.

Ensure that medicines are prescribed and given by people safely.

Follow published guidance about how to use medicines safely.
My thoughts:-
Unsafe and management of medicines is usually the result of a lack of understanding of the legislation and guidance which governs medicines administration in all care settings.

  • Policies become out-dated as legislation changes and time whizzes by so fast you don’t realise just how out of date they have become.
  • A nervousness around taking responsibility for administering medication often leads to policies which are full of don’t and can’ts where medication administration by carers is concerned. Unfortunately, often this leaves your carers and clients at risk in not being able to fully support the client with their medication when they require it. As a result, companies who think they are protecting themselves from the responsibility of administering medicines often leave themselves inadvertently in a very vulnerable position legally.
  • Policy writers are stuck in the “old ways” of doing things assuming their way is the right way and maybe it’s not!
  • Policies around medication are not detailed enough to give clear guidance to nursing and care teams
  • A lack of quality training updated at least every 2 years if not annually given to all levels of the care and nursing teams.
  • Our nurses may be nurses but they need to be kept up to date too!

Service users should expect to have their medicines at the times they need need them and in a safe way. This becomes even more important as we move forward into the personalisation agenda – does your organisation ask the client how and where they would like to recieve their medication and at what times? (within reason to meet the requirements of the prescription)
Do you have a system in place to ensure that clients are informed about what they take medication for, possible side effects etc.? How will you make this information available to them? Do you have patient information leaflets for all the medication the client takes?

Ensuring that your current training arrangements provide expert knowledge will ensure that you get the policies that you work to right,  and that your teams are trained so that they are competent and confident in their role is essential to meet the new standards. May be now would be a good time to start taking a look at these things.

Next week we’ll take a look at Standard 9a in a little more detail – Providing personalised care through the effective use of medicines to guide you through it.

 

Categories of Medicines

December 5, 2011

Categories of Medicines

Why can you obtain some medicines from a pharmacist, or even buy them from a supermarket, while others can only be obtained with a prescription from your doctor or other healthcare professional?
The difference depends on the level of supervision that experts in medicines consider is needed before you use a particular medicine.
Under laws governing the supply of medicines, there are three categories determining how you obtain medicine:

Prescription-only medicines

(POMs) are available only on a prescription issued by a doctor or other suitably qualified healthcare professional, such as a nurse or pharmacist. You need to see the healthcare professional before they give you a prescription. You’ll then have to take the prescription to a pharmacy or, in rural areas, a dispensing GP surgery for your prescription to be dispensed. Examples of POMs are inhalers to treat asthma or medicines to lower high blood pressure.

Pharmacy (P) medicines

are available from a pharmacy without a prescription, but under the supervision of a pharmacist. You need to ask the pharmacy staff for this type of medicine as it will be kept “behind the counter” and will not be available for you to pick up from the pharmacy shelves. The pharmacist or another member of staff will check that the medicine is appropriate for you and your health problem, and will ask questions to ensure that there’s no reason why you shouldn’t use the medicine. An example of a medicine that you can buy from a pharmacy without a prescription is chloramphenicol eye drops to treat an eye infection.

General sales list (GSL) medicines

can be bought from pharmacies, supermarkets and other retail outlets without the supervision of a pharmacist. These include medicines to treat minor, self-limiting complaints that people may feel aren’t serious enough to see their doctor or pharmacist about, such as the common cold, headaches, other aches and pains, minor cuts and stomach-related upsets.

Can medicines change their status?

New medicines tend to be licensed in the POM category so that healthcare professionals can supervise their use during the first few years they’re available. If a medicine proves safe in large numbers of patients over several years, the regulatory agency may consider changing it from POM to P.
EU regulations encourage switching medicines from POM to P as long as there’s no danger to health if the medicine is used without a prescriber’s supervision and the medicine is unlikely to be used incorrectly.
If a P medicine has shown no problems after several years, it may be considered for a switch to GSL status, so that it can be sold directly from retail outlets.
The UK is currently leading the world in making medicines available over the counter (OTC). A wide range of medicines have switched from both POM to P and P to GSL over the past 20 years, including ibuprofen for pain relief, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) for stopping smoking, emergency hormone contraception, and clotrimazole and fluconazole for vaginal thrush.
More recently, simvastatin, a medicine that reduces cholesterol as a means of reducing the risk of heart attack, and chloramphenicol eye drops for eye infections have also switched from POM to P.
The government has said that it’s committed to increasing the availability of OTC medicines for common complaints, including treatments for long-term conditions, such as high blood pressure, where it’s safe to do so.
Are medicines I can buy from a pharmacy just as effective and safe?

If a medicine switches from POM to P, or from P to GSL, the active drug remains exactly the same. This means that it’s just as effective as when it had to be prescribed by a qualified prescriber. It also means that there’s the same risk of side effects if you take too high a dose or if you don’t follow the instructions on the label, so it’s important to follow the instructions carefully. Your pharmacist will be able to advise you about any side effects

Get the Most from Your Pharmacy Services

April 10, 2008

How much do you know about the services that pharmacies offer which make could make life easier for both you and your service users?

Most pharmacies offer some form of prescription collection and/or delivery service. Many pharmacies will also order the prescription on the patient’s behalf too, they keep the repeat and you let them know what you need – cutting out yet another step of the process for the service user. Ask your pharmacy about repeat medication services.

As well as prescription services, the pharmacy, under it’s new Pharmacy Contract, is able to offer a range of other services which you, or your service users might find particularly useful.

Compliance Aids and the DDA

One of these services is the provision of compliance aids under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). Under new contract, the pharmacy is required to carry out an assessment with any service user who requests a compliance aid. This assessment helps to ascertain whether the service user is disabled and therefore qualifies for free support in the form of compliance aids.

Compliance aids, as we discussed in unit 1 of this course include the following:-

· Dosette or similar boxes

· Non-child proof tops

· Large print labels

· Braille labels

· Talking labels

· Provision of medication administration record charts

· Colour coding of labels to time of day

The purpose is to enable the service user the necessary support to get the most from their medicines and remain as independent as possible.

Medicines Use Reviews

A medicines use review is an appointment with a pharmacist to focus on how the an individual is getting on with their medicines. It usually takes place in the local pharmacy, but with permission from the Primary Care Trust, may take place in a service user’s home. It is an NHS service – and is free to the service user.

The meeting is to:

· Help the service user to find out more about the medicines

they are taking.

· Pick up any problems they are having with their medicines.

· Improve the effectiveness of their medicines.

· There may be easier ways to take them, or the service user may find that they need fewer medicines than before.

· Get better value for the NHS – making sure that the medicines are right for the individual to prevent unnecessary waste.

The pharmacist will have questions and may suggest changes to the

medicines. The service user may have concerns or questions that they want to ask about.

A medicine user review can be requested by ay the service user or any health professional or carer as long as the service user gives their consent.

Repeat Dispensing

Under the new contract you don’t have to go back to the doctor every time you need to renew a prescription. Instead, your doctor can give a prescription lasting up to a year and the pharmacist can dispense the medicines as and when they are needed. This service is called “Repeat Dispensing” and is available to patients who are stable on long term medication. More and more pharmacies and surgeries are offering this service and it may well be worth asking about.

Public Health Advice

In order to help reduce health inequalities and improve health the pharmacist can give you and your service users clinical and lifestyle advice on how to become healthier. This includes advice and information on how to stop smoking, reducing high blood pressure, lose weight and improve your diet. This will help to proactively tackle national diseases such as obesity, coronary heart disease and cancer. Pharmacies will be taking part in local and national health promotion campaigns

Signposting

If you have a health problem and are not sure where you should go to get advice or treatment, your pharmacist can help put you in touch with the appropriate service.

Self Care

Your pharmacist is be able to advise on which over the counter medicines are best for self-limiting conditions as well as give help on other things you could do to help you or your service user feel better.