Archive for the ‘future’ Category

Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 6

January 24, 2012

9g Where people who use services receive support with their medicines, the provider has:
●● Additional clear procedures followed in practice, monitored and reviewed for medicines handling that include obtaining, administration, monitoring and disposal. Wherever they are required these procedures include:
— how clinical trials are carried out in line with relevant laws, current guidelines and ethics committee approval
— sharing concerns about medicines handling.

Here you will required to have written procedure for all aspects of medicines management that include how to order medicines, how to receive them into the service including the records that need to be kept too. Detailed procedures for your team to follow with regards to administering medication in line with the National Minimum Standards and the RPSGB Safe Handling of Medicines in Social Care documents which detail the levels of support and administration that can be provided by a carer.

You will need to have procedures and appropriate records that show that you monitor both the administration of medication by your staff and that you monitor self-administration by clients to ensure that it is still appropriate.

When disposing of medicines always return the m to the pharmacy for safe disposal and ensure that appropriate records are kept, unless you are a nursing home, then you must make your own arrangements for safe disposal via a licensed waste carrier service. In both cases, if a resident dies in your care you must retain the medication for at least 7 days in case it is requested by a coroner.

All policies and procedures should be reviewed regularly to ensure that you keep abreast of changes n legislation or local policy. Do yours show a date last reviewed and/or next review date on them?

●● Established arrangements for obtaining pharmaceutical information by a
person who understands the care, treatment or support that is provided
by the service.
Ideally this would be an expert in medicines such as your local pharmacist, PCT pharmacist or GP practice pharmacist. Alternatively this may be an appropriate health professional such as a GP or Specialist Nurse or other health care professional.

9g People who use services receive care, treatment and support that:

●● Ensures medicines required for resuscitation or other medical emergencies
are accessible in tamper evident packaging that allows them to be
administered as quickly as possible.

Next time we’re exploring Outcomes 9i and 9j – the final of the outcomes for medication.

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Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 4

January 10, 2012

Promotes Rights and Choices

9D People who use services benefit from a service that:

●● Ensures that wherever possible, information is available for people about the medicines they are taking, including the risks.
Here you will need to think about how you get that information from reliable sources and deliver the information to the client in a way that they can best understand. This includes information about prescribed medicines and over the counter medicines where appropriate. http://www.BNF.org is a great source of information but will probably be too technical for clients. Ask the pharmacist for Patient Information Leaflets where possible a good medicines book that has been written for the public that puts it more in layman’s terms – jargon free.

●● Ensures information is available for people about medicines advisable for
them to take for their health and wellbeing and also to prevent ill health.
Do you have information available to provide to clients to enable them to be proactive in becoming more healthy and staying healthy. This information may be for supplements, vitamins, minerals, homeopathic or herbal medicines for foods that promote health and well being.

●● Ensures there is access for staff to up-to-date legislation and guidance
related to medicines handling.
Training and continuing professional development and or competency assessment is key to this point. Training that meets the requirements for the CQC, Skills for Care and Essential Standards. Ensuring that staff are aware of and have access to not only your own medication policies but to the actual legislation and guidance documents as well. Do your policies and procedures actually reflect legislation and guidance or would now be a good time to review them to make sure that they do?

●● Ensures best interest meetings are held with people who know and
understand the person using the services when covert administration of
medicines is being considered, to decide whether this is in the person’s best
interest.
Medication may only be given covertly with certain consent. A team of multidisciplinary health professionals must come together to discuss the individual case and give consent in writing. I highly recommend that a pharmacist is part of this team to ensure that if medication is being given covertly because it is in the best interest of the client and they do not have capacity that that medication is put in to food that is appropriate and that that medication can be crushed if that is the proposal. I have heard some interesting and frightening stories recently of medication being authorised to be given covertly and instruction given by the doctor to put it in a hot drink, or hot food or even medication that needs to be swallowed whole being wrapped in toast! How would you not chew it??? So whilst a doctor is an expert in diagnosis and disease, the majority are not experts in medicines – please keep your clients safe by involving the pharmacist who is an expert in medicines.
I’m sure at some point we will cover covert administration and medicines in food as a separate article – please let me know if this would be useful to you.

Next week we will look at Outcome 9e and 9f – so more good stuff to come!

Essential Standards Outcome 9 Pt 1

December 19, 2011

 Providing personalised care through the effective use of medicines

9A. People who use services receive care, treatment and support that:

Ensures the medicines given are appropriate and person-centred by taking account of their:

  • age
  • choices
  • lifestyle
  • cultural and religious beliefs
  • allergies and intolerances
  • existing medical conditions and prescriptions
  • adverse drug reactions
  • recommended prescribing regimes.

Ensures the person’s prescription for medicines, for which the service is responsible, is up to date and is reviewed and changed as their needs or condition changes.

Includes monitoring the effect of their medicines and action when necessary if their condition changes including side effects and adverse reactions.

Includes supporting and reminding them to self-administer their medicines independently where they are able and wish to do so by minimising the risk of incorrect administration.

Follows clear procedures in practice, which are monitored and reviewed, which explain how up-to-date medicines information and clinical reference sources for staff are made available.

My thoughts:-
Does the person who does the care needs assessment have medicines training to ensure that all of these things are taken in to consideration?
In my experience specialising in medicines in care the answer to that question is more often than not a resounding NO! That is usually reflecting in the care plan produced, giving providers little information about medication, it’s use, personalisation, promoting independence, allergies etc. Quality training for assessors in Medication Needs Assessment is essential to ensure that our assessors know exactly what information is required to gather from the client AND to give to the client.

A community or primary care trust pharmacist can help support you with medicines use reviews – a free service that would provide you with so much information and and advice – make sure you take advantage of it!

Promoting independence with medicines is a subject dear to my heart as many of you who have trained with me will know. There are so many wonderful compliance aids available to enable clients to take or use their medication more easily and yet the care industry seem to have missed out on this information.  I’ll make sure this appears again in later newsletters to empower you to enable your service users too.

Clinical reference sources and medicines information can be found in the BNF or go to http://www.BNF.org and use the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain’s publication The Safe Handling of Medicines in Social Care

Next week we’ll cover Standard 9b – Manage risk through effective procedures about medicines handling. Hope you’re finding this useful 🙂

Meeting Essential Standards – Managing Medicines

December 12, 2011

What do the regulations say?

Regulation 13 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010

Management of medicines
13.The registered person must protect service users against the risks associated with the unsafe use and management of medicines, by means of the making of appropriate arrangements for the obtaining, recording, handling, using, safe keeping, dispensing, safe administration and disposal of medicines used for the purposes of the regulated activity.

What should people who use services experience?
People who use services:

Will have their medicines at the times they need them, and in a safe way.

Wherever possible will have information about the medicine being prescribed made available to them or others acting on their behalf.

This is because providers who comply with the regulations will:

Handle medicines safely, securely and appropriately.

Ensure that medicines are prescribed and given by people safely.

Follow published guidance about how to use medicines safely.
My thoughts:-
Unsafe and management of medicines is usually the result of a lack of understanding of the legislation and guidance which governs medicines administration in all care settings.

  • Policies become out-dated as legislation changes and time whizzes by so fast you don’t realise just how out of date they have become.
  • A nervousness around taking responsibility for administering medication often leads to policies which are full of don’t and can’ts where medication administration by carers is concerned. Unfortunately, often this leaves your carers and clients at risk in not being able to fully support the client with their medication when they require it. As a result, companies who think they are protecting themselves from the responsibility of administering medicines often leave themselves inadvertently in a very vulnerable position legally.
  • Policy writers are stuck in the “old ways” of doing things assuming their way is the right way and maybe it’s not!
  • Policies around medication are not detailed enough to give clear guidance to nursing and care teams
  • A lack of quality training updated at least every 2 years if not annually given to all levels of the care and nursing teams.
  • Our nurses may be nurses but they need to be kept up to date too!

Service users should expect to have their medicines at the times they need need them and in a safe way. This becomes even more important as we move forward into the personalisation agenda – does your organisation ask the client how and where they would like to recieve their medication and at what times? (within reason to meet the requirements of the prescription)
Do you have a system in place to ensure that clients are informed about what they take medication for, possible side effects etc.? How will you make this information available to them? Do you have patient information leaflets for all the medication the client takes?

Ensuring that your current training arrangements provide expert knowledge will ensure that you get the policies that you work to right,  and that your teams are trained so that they are competent and confident in their role is essential to meet the new standards. May be now would be a good time to start taking a look at these things.

Next week we’ll take a look at Standard 9a in a little more detail – Providing personalised care through the effective use of medicines to guide you through it.

 

Leadership in Social Care – Who Cares?

November 22, 2007


j0321189.jpgFollowing a recent government report highlighting a leadership crisis in the business world, we now have a parliamentary review in Social Care which highlights a similar lack of leadership with in the social care sector. What’s it about and how can we ensure leadership skills are developed for the future?

Social Care Minster Ivan Lewis announced that the centre piece for the government’s vision for 21st century social care will be a skills academy, Social Care21 to focus on developing world class leadership and commissioning in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

It seems that Leadership – or the lack of it – is very topical at the moment. A government report recently highlighted that the business world in general is suffering from a distinct lack of leadership. Managers that we hope will be at the fore front of our businesses and organisations in the future do not have the inspirational leadership role models that they need around them in their work places. In social care there is no strong vision or ambition driving how services for adults can be delivered. Dame Denise Platt observes that the service calls for imagination, excitement and enthusiasm which requires leadership across the care sector at all levels.

There is an argument that owner managers in social care are the leaders in the private sector and that Dame Denise Platt ignored them in her review. I wonder were there enough of them to shout loudly enough? Why were they overlooked or over shadowed by the leaders of large organizations? How will they resolve to be heard in the future? More importantly, how will they mentor, coach and inspire leaders of the future?

A skills academy is a wonderful vision, I hope it will achieve it’s aims but it will take time to get up such an enormous undertaking up and running smoothly. I would suggest that in the meantime we take responsibility where we are to step up to the leadership challenge.

How? By understanding what leadership is and how we become leaders within our own domains and abilities. By creating a clear vision for ourselves, our organizations and our employees. By deciding to be the best and give our best in what ever our role is. By creating mentors and role models for those who work for us. You might not be (or aspire to be) a chief executive of a large organization but your part in nurturing leadership is just as important. In order to have strong leadership in the sector a t all levels it has to touch all levels, including ground level.

Are you ready to step up to the leadership challenge?