Archive for the ‘CQC’ Category

Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 7

January 31, 2012

9i. People who use services receive care, treatment and support from staff who:

●● Ensure they make a record of any medication taken or reminded by the person using the service where this is part of the plan of care.
Carer helping elderly lady
Good record keeping, once more is absolutely key to meeting the essential standards for medicines and should be kept whether you are administering at level 2 or just reminding someone to take their medicines at levels 1 or 2. Do you record the prompting of medication? You should be.

●● Follow clear procedures, that are monitored and reviewed, that explain:
— their role with regards to helping people take their medicines
— what staff should do if the person using services is unable, or refuses, to
take their medicines.

So here you need to review your policies and procedure to ensure that they clearly detail; the role of the carer in administering (or reminding) medicines and what they can and cannot do within the 3 levels of support outlined in the guidance in the National Minimum Standards and CQC guidance.
Do your staff understand what to do, who to notify and what to record when a client refuses to take their medicines? Your policies need to clearly state what to do when a client refuses medication. What to record, who to inform and what consequences might be encountered.
Staff need to be aware that they can inform the client of consequences, they can encourage them to take the medication, they can try in 5 minutes times, perhaps ask a colleague to administer instead, but they cannot force a client to take the medication. A client has the right to refuse whether we think it’s a the right decision or not.

9j People who use services receive care, treatment and support from staff who:
●● Ensure that patient safety alerts, rapid response reports and patient safety
recommendations disseminated by the National Patient Safety Agency and
which require action are acted upon within required timescales.

So there you have it – the last of the part for Outcome 9 in the Essential Standards.
I trust that you have found the information useful and that it has been the catalyst to review policies and training. If Momentum People can support you with either or both please email us or give us a call to discuss.

Advertisements

Essential Standards Outcome 9 pt 6

January 24, 2012

9g Where people who use services receive support with their medicines, the provider has:
●● Additional clear procedures followed in practice, monitored and reviewed for medicines handling that include obtaining, administration, monitoring and disposal. Wherever they are required these procedures include:
— how clinical trials are carried out in line with relevant laws, current guidelines and ethics committee approval
— sharing concerns about medicines handling.

Here you will required to have written procedure for all aspects of medicines management that include how to order medicines, how to receive them into the service including the records that need to be kept too. Detailed procedures for your team to follow with regards to administering medication in line with the National Minimum Standards and the RPSGB Safe Handling of Medicines in Social Care documents which detail the levels of support and administration that can be provided by a carer.

You will need to have procedures and appropriate records that show that you monitor both the administration of medication by your staff and that you monitor self-administration by clients to ensure that it is still appropriate.

When disposing of medicines always return the m to the pharmacy for safe disposal and ensure that appropriate records are kept, unless you are a nursing home, then you must make your own arrangements for safe disposal via a licensed waste carrier service. In both cases, if a resident dies in your care you must retain the medication for at least 7 days in case it is requested by a coroner.

All policies and procedures should be reviewed regularly to ensure that you keep abreast of changes n legislation or local policy. Do yours show a date last reviewed and/or next review date on them?

●● Established arrangements for obtaining pharmaceutical information by a
person who understands the care, treatment or support that is provided
by the service.
Ideally this would be an expert in medicines such as your local pharmacist, PCT pharmacist or GP practice pharmacist. Alternatively this may be an appropriate health professional such as a GP or Specialist Nurse or other health care professional.

9g People who use services receive care, treatment and support that:

●● Ensures medicines required for resuscitation or other medical emergencies
are accessible in tamper evident packaging that allows them to be
administered as quickly as possible.

Next time we’re exploring Outcomes 9i and 9j – the final of the outcomes for medication.

CQC Criticised – Have they put patient care at risk?

December 6, 2011

Criticism has been levelled at the Care Quality Commission for apparently putting its registration responsibilities ahead of its duty to inspect hospital trusts and social care providers.

The Pharmaceutical Journal reports today that…

Labour MP Margaret Hodge, chairman of the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee, accused the CQC of “significant failures that [have] put patient care at risk”. She said the organisation — which formed following the merger of three statutory regulators in 2009, and is responsible for regulating nine health profession regulatory bodies, including the General Pharmaceutical Council — is too focused on “box ticking, and not enough on crossing the threshold and assuring quality of care”.

Her comments follow a report on the CQC published last week (2 December 2011) by the National Audit Office, which concludes that the commission is an underfunded organisation chasing to catch up with Government inspection targets.

Between October 2010 and April 2011, the CQC was struggling to meet its inspection obligations and had achieved only 47 per cent of them, the NAO report says. Despite working with a budget smaller than the combined budgets of the organisations it replaced, the CQC also fails to represent value for money, the report adds.

Commission has since taken steps to improve

NAO comptroller and auditor general Amyas Morse welcomed steps the CQC has since taken to improve its service, adding: “Against a backdrop of considerable upheaval, the CQC has had an uphill struggle to carry out its work effectively and has experienced serious difficulties.

“There is a gap between what the public and providers expect and what [the CQC] can achieve. The commission and the Department of Health should make clear what successful regulation of this critical sector would look like.”

CQC chief executive Cynthia Bower said the commission faced a “difficult task” in its infancy, but is now on track to deliver real benefits for people who use health and social care services.

Here’s the report from the National Audit Office