Consent and Medicines Management


Forms Before any support with medication can happen in care the service user must give their consent. In order to give informed consent they must first be given all of the information they require to make a decision about their level of care. It is important that information is shared freely with the service user, this will include providing patient information leaflets to your service users, and if necessary reading and explaining these to them if they are not able to do this themselves.

A service user can agree to treatment and care verbally, in writing or by implying (by co-operating) that they agree. Even though verbal consent or consent by implication would be enough evidence in most cases written consent is always preferable and probably expected in most care agency policies.

Service user consent should be obtained and recorded in the care plan during the care assessment. Both the service user and the assessor should sign and date the document. Written consent stands as a record that discussions have taken place and of the service users choice. however, the service user had the right to refuse consent and may do so at any time during his or her care. This may be detrimental to their care and you must provide them with the information they require to be fully informed I making their decision but if they still refuse to consent then you must respect that decision. You should make a record of the refusal and document what information was given and who else you involved such as your line manager or GP in the service users records.

What you should never do is hide the medication in food or beverages for the service user to take without knowing that it is there. This is covert administration of medicines and is considered to be abuse.

In an emergency situation were treatment is necessary to preserve life and the service user cannot make a decision (for example because they are unconscious), the law allows you to provide treatment without their consent, providing you are sure you are always acting in their best interest.

You should also know that if the service user is an adult, consent from relatives is not sufficient on its own to protect you in the event of a challenge, as nobody has the right to give consent on behalf of another adult unless the service user has passed over the power of attorney to another person. In this case the other person can give their consent for you to administer medication

As you can see gaining consent may not be as straightforward as it first appears. Nonetheless, it is a vital part of caring for people. The reason it is so important is that it is assumed that the service user is the best person to be in control of their care. So any procedure that may affect them can only be given once they have consented to the care and this includes medication.

 

For further information Contact

Tracey Dowe

email training@momentumpeople.co.uk

Tel 01793 700929

http://www.momentumpeople.co.uk

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